Old Homestead Sites at Triple N Ranch Wildlife Management Area

 

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Old Homestead Site

I explored at Triple N Ranch Wildlife Management Area located in Osceola County by the small town of Holopaw. It is a large area with around 16,000 acres of property that has many trails to hike and places to roam.

The area has a lot of history as well, the area was part of the last large open range in the United States. At the beginning of the twentieth century Florida south of Orlando was the only place east of the Mississippi where the population density was less than two persons per square mile.

Open range ranching continued in Florida until 1949, when the Florida Legislature passed a law requiring all cattle to be fenced. The central Florida palmetto prairie was home to the Florida cow, a small, bony, long-horned descendant of Spanish cattle that was able to survive heat, bugs, and poor forage.

If you do explore this area I would suggest it in the dry cooler months of winter as it can get very wet and hot there during the summer. Though there are many shaded hammocks and scenic trails, a lot of the area is also open pine scrub habitat.

My Video

Old Homestead Sites at Triple N Ranch Wildlife Management Area

Resources

Triple N Ranch History

Visiting Triple N Ranch

Abandoned Richloam Fire Tower in Withlacoochee State Forest

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View of Forest from top of Fire Tower

For sometime now I have been wanting to climb this abandoned fire tower located in the Withlacoochee State Forest at the Richloam Tract. It was always something that was a bit intimidating for me but I finally got the courage to climb it. The tower is open to the public but visitors must climb it at their own risk as posted on the sign by the stairs.

The tower dates back to the around the 1930’s and 40’s and was used to monitor wild fires. Another interesting fact, this tower was used to monitor mustard gas tests that went on in this section of the forest during WWII.

Check out my video below to get an idea of the experience and to see some amazing views from high above the surrounding forest.

My Video

Abandoned Fire Tower in Withlacoochee State Forest

Resources

Richloam Tract at Withlacoochee State Forest

Historical Information

 

Lone Gravesite at Andrews Wildlife Management Area

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Gravesite

I have always enjoyed the scenic wilderness along this part of the Suwannee River at Andrews Wildlife Management Area. There are many trails and recreational opportunities here. Some of the history includes logging and agricultural uses going back to the 1800’s, the land was purchased by the Andrews family in 1945, they managed the land for outdoor recreation. The state bought the land in 1985.

One of the interesting sites I found there while exploring was a lone gravesite, the tombstone is mostly gone now so I couldn’t see who was buried here and when. There is a wooden fence surrounding the grave so it seems to be maintained from time to time.

After some further research I was able to track down some information on the site. It is the grave of an infant child that died around 1898 his name was Walter Miller Owens, the father was a man named Randall Owens. So far that is all the history I could uncover on the area, they also may have had a homestead nearby.

It is amazing seeing these areas today and imagining how they once were and who lived there. You can’t help but get a sense of the history in places like this and this gravesite is a reminder from a time long gone.

Video Tour

Lone Gravesite at Andrews Wildlife Management Area

Resources

Andrews W.M.A.

Levy County Cemeteries – Owens Family Cemetery

Orleans Ghost Town in Citrus County

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Citrus County Map 1890’s

Orleans was one of the many ghost towns that existed in Citrus County back in the late 1800’s. It was a small community with maybe a population of around 100 or so. It was settled in 1885 but didn’t last very much longer after that. The town may have began to fade after the great freezes of 1894-95 which wiped out many of the crops. Another thing to consider is back in those days influenza was an epidemic in some other small towns like this and could’ve had an impact there as well.

One of the main sites that still remains from the town is the cemetery, I had visited it awhile back and that inspired me to see what else could be out there. I studied old county maps trying to narrow down the townsite to the best of my ability and then began exploring the woods there to see what I could find.

Along the way I could see Herty cup pieces which are remnants from the turpentine industry here. It was also a large industry in this area back in those times, farmers would even get into the business when crops weren’t doing as good to help supplement income.

Further into the woods I found what appears to be a large cistern in the ground, they were used to collect and store water. It is possible there was a homestead nearby but couldn’t see any direct evidence on this trip. I could see old paths throughout the area which were used as roads back during the time of the town. Exploring down one of those I saw remains of a well and that was really neat to see. I could see bricks, pieces of metal and other remnants left from the town.

There are some many areas to roam out here and who knows what else could remain with so many layers of history. I am looking forward to exploring more in the future and it’s always a nice place to take in the nature as well.

My Video

Orleans Ghost Town

Resources

Ghost Towns of Florida – Orleans

Withlacoochee State Forest

Video Diary: Indian Mounds by The Withlacoochee River

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Shell Midden

On this hike I set out to find and explore more Indian Mounds along the Withlacoochee River. I had been studying some history on the Cove of The Withlacoochee and has since inspired me to uncover as much as I can in the area. On a previous trip I had found a burial mound that could date back to the 1500’s when the Hernando DeSoto and the Spanish were exploring these areas. In a way I have been tracing their steps.

On this quest I attempted to explore further up river where some shell middens are and I managed to track them down. These mounds were built up over many years from natives discarding shells, bones, pottery and other debris. I would imagine they were places of higher ground along the swamps as well. Many would have villages nearby so there are a lot of layers of history behind these places.

Exploring the mounds I could see the shells embedded and even some pottery fragments scattered in some areas. Of course leaving everything as I see it… I noticed the various shapes and sizes of these mounds. Surely they were much larger at one time but it is still amazing to see how big some of them still are today. Overall it is just rewarding to be in the presence of such history.

After roaming around and seeing what mounds I could on this trip I left with more enthusiasm to see what else I can uncover in these places. So I am looking forward to the adventure! Check out my video links below to get a glimpse of the history.

Indian Mounds by The Withlacoochee River

Indian Mound in The Cove of Withlacoochee

Video Diary: Hike to Bailey Mine in Levy County

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Bailey Mine

This is a video I put together from an area known as the Watermelon Pond Tract in Levy County. It is actually a section of Goethe State Forest but just not connected to the main part. There is a trailhead that can be found near the town of Archer known as Bailey Mine Trailhead.

If you study old maps of this area there is actually a mine here known as Bailey Mine. It was used for phosphate mining in the early 1900’s. On this adventure I set out to find the mine and see what else I could discover along the way. There was also turpentine operations in the area as well so I thought I may see some evidence from that.

There is a railroad line that was used back then, today it is abandoned and mostly overgrown. I figured if I could find that I could navigate my way towards Bailey Mine since the railroad went right to it.

I found the railroad line along one of the hiking trails and followed that for several miles, checking out some of the scenery and areas along the way. I did find some Herty cup fragments from the turpentine industry and took some time to explore that history as well.

I managed to follow the railroad line to where it ends at Bailey Mine. This mine is filled in with water so who knows how deep it really goes. The other mines I found in the area were dry so you could get a really good view of how much digging was going on and how deep they were. Back then you would’ve seen machinery all around these places. As I explored Bailey Mine I went along the bottom of it and circled around the entire mine.

I really enjoyed this adventure I had explored this area a few years before but wanted to return to see what else I may be able to uncover. The beauty and history of these places always keep you coming back for more. Check out my video to see my adventure, thanks!

Video of Bailey Mine at Watermelon Pond Tract in Levy County

Link to Watermelon Pond Tract in Goethe State Forest

Tishler Indian Mound in Ocala National Forest

13320494_10154897336052468_4531916956174059980_oOcala National Forest is a scenic place to explore but also a place of rich history. Dating back around 11,000 years ago and through the first European colonization of the New World, several waves of cultures lived along the St. Johns River and along the lakes in is what is now the Ocala National Forest. The word “Ocala” is most likely derived from the Creek “ue-kiwv,” meaning “springs.” The Ocala National Forest is the land of many springs.

One of the fascinating historical sites in the forest is known as Tishler Mound, an ancient burial mound dating back to the St John’s culture built between 500 BC and 800 AD. Pottery fragments found at the site indicated that it dates back around 1200 to 2500 years.

Over the years unfortunately the mound has been disturbed but is now a protected site today in the forest. There is a wooden fence around the site where the mound can still be viewed and a nice a kiosk there describing the history. It is amazing to still be able experience these places this many years later and hopefully it will be the same for future generations.

My Video

Tishler Mound in Ocala National Forest

Resources

Ocala National Forest History

Pershing Highway in Tiger Bay State Forest (Interpretive Trail)

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Entrance to Pershing Highway

There is some interesting history in this part of Tiger Bay State Forest located in Volusia County known as the old Pershing Highway. It was a brick road constructed in the early 1900’s and was the first highway to connect DeLand to Daytona Beach. The road was abandoned in the late 1940’s once the modern Highway 92 was completed.  The road was named after the famous Word War I General John J. Pershing. It was part of the Pershing Triangle which connected Daytona, DeLand, and New Smyrna Beach.

I wrote a previous blog post about another section of this road still visible in other parts of this forest but isn’t as nice as this one in my opinion. There is no vehicle traffic is allowed on this particular section of the road. This brick road today is part of an interpretive trail where you can take a walk into the past, learn about some history of the area and see a piece of old Florida.

The “trail” or brick road here is only about a mile or so not to long of a hike. Although there are some other nice areas to explore and hike not far from here in different parts of the forest. So if you are in the area it is worth the visit for sure. Please be respectful of the history that remains, do not remove any bricks. Thank you and check out my video, photos and links below for more information.

My Video

Pershing Highway in Tiger Bay State Forest

Resources

Volusia’s Roads and Highways

Out in The Boonies: Tiger Bay State Forest

Tiger Bay State Forest

Location/Map

Other Section of The Pershing Highway

Alto Ghost Town in Sumter County

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Alto on 1890 Sumter County Map

Exploring in the wilderness of Half Moon Wildlife Management Area you may not know but at one there was a small community out here in the late 1800’s known as Alto. The preserve is located in Sumter County and has many layers of history. Initially I learned about Alto Cemetery and that lead to me to learning about the old town it was a small community and had a one room school house. The town of Alto formed in the 1880’s when several families moved into the area. You can see it on some old maps. Many of the forest roads are named after these families who had homesteads nearby. Steamboats ran on the Withlacoochee River at that time and Alto Landing refers to a former ferry boat crossing.

Many settlers came here from the Carolinas after the Seminole wars and they established homesteads in the area using federal land grants as compensation for their voluntary service. In exchange for the land they were required to reside and cultivate crops for five years while bearing arms. The settlers raised horses and cattle and cultivated food crops such as peanuts, corn, sugarcane, oats, sweet potatoes and peas.

I am not sure how long the actual long the actual community lasted many of the people buried in the cemetery are those of infants and small children. A reminder of the harsh life experienced by these early Florida pioneers. One of the early homesteads was the McKinney cattle ranch it was inhabited from 1916 to around 1945. After World War II the McKinney family sold the land. Nearby in the swamps and uplands logging operations were taking place. A railroad was built by Cummer Sons Cypress Company and ran alongside the Withlacoochee River.

The land was used by the Carlton family in the 1960’s and 70’s for cattle ranching and during the 1980’s the land was leased to a hunt club. In 1989 the land was purchased by the state in an effort to help preserve the water quality of the Withlacoochee River and its tributaries. Today it is part of the Southwest Water Management District with many miles of trails and scenic areas to roam. But you can’t help but get a sense of the history when exploring the area and that is one of the reasons I enjoy it so much.

My Videos

Alto Ghost Town

Old Logging Tram

Old Cattle Ramp

Resources

Half Moon WMA History

Half Moon Wildlife Management Area

 

 

Gainer Cemetery in Washington County

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I did some exploring and hiking at Econfina Creek Wildlife Management Area which is in Washington County in northern Florida. This area of the state to me still has that “old Florida” feel to it and there is a lot of wilderness areas to experience and naturally with that I wanted to see what history I could discover along the way.

Well one of the areas I found was an old cemetery dating back to the 1800’s called Gainer Cemetery. The cemetery is in decent condition though some of the tombstones are damaged, overall it is a very peaceful and beautiful place in the woods there. I found it off a forest road and learned that there was a homestead nearby at one time as well. It belonged to the Gainer family who had settled here back in those days. There is a fence around the cemetery and it seems to be kept up from time to time. There were some newer tombstones as well which suggests it is still an active cemetery most likely used by descendants of the Gainer family.  I truly enjoyed visiting the site and it inspired me to learn as much history as possible on the area.

Here is some interesting history on the area “William Gainer, a surveyor and mathematician, came to the Econfina area in 1824 or 1825 and established his homestead and a large ranch on the west side of Econfina Creek. Gainer had served as a scout and surveyor in the U.S. Army during Andrew Jackson’s 1818 invasion of Florida. It was during his time of service in the U.S. Army in West Florida that Gainer surveyed the Econfina area and determined that he would eventually bring his family back to the area to settle. The Gainer homestead reportedly served as a church and school until both were established within the Econfina community south of the Gainer home place. The Gainer place also served as the area “post office” until the U.S. post office was established in Econfina in 1855. William Gainer patented several tracts of land in the Econfina area beginning in 1837 and is reported to have lived at or near the original Gainer homestead until his death at age 84, in 1870. William Gainer’s son, Thomas Henry, also died in 1870, possibly from long-term complications resulting from wounds received during his service in the Confederate army at the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia, in 1864. The homestead was abandoned soon thereafter. The Gainer Family Cemetery is where William Gainer (1786-1870); his first wife Jane Watts Gainer (1792-1837); his sons William Augustus Gainer (1824-1912), Thomas H. Gainer (1834-1870), and Walter R. Gainer (1836-1920); and Eugenia O. Gainer (1848-1941) were laid to rest.”

My Video

Gainer Cemetery in Washington County

Resources

Burial Record

Econfina Wildlife Management Area

Osceola Ghost Town in Seminole County

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Exploring by St. Johns River

This is a neat place to visit at Lake Harney Wilderness Area, where up until the mid-1900’s was the site of Osceola a former sawmill town. There is a historical marker at the parking area that describes the history of the area. I followed some of the trails around to see what I may be able to find and part of one takes you onto the old railroad grade, I followed that to the end where an old bridge once was. Along the way was a kiosk with photos and descriptions about the history of the area. Just down the way from the trailhead along the road is the old vault remains from a town building once there.

In 1916 the Osceola Cypress Company and built a huge sawmill and a complete town in Seminole County known as Osceola. It was near the St. Johns River where part of the Florida East Coast Railway went through and crossed the river. Osceola was around 350 acres with homes, a doctors office, commissary store, school, company office building, boarding house, post office, barber shop, railroad, sawmill and lumber yard. The railroad hauled cypress logs to the mill. In the late 1930’s the Osceola Cypress Company started moving its operations to Port Everglades. In 1940 the last residents of Osceola moved out. During the second Seminole war, in 1837, this was the site of King Philip’s town, a Seminole camp. After the Civil War the area was known as “Cooks Ferry” until the Florida East Coast Railroad Company bridged the river in 1911.

It is a nice preserve to explore where you can take in some of the history and scenic wilderness along the St. Johns River. One of the trails leads to a nice observation tower where you can experience stunning views of the St. Johns River Floodplain. Check out some of the photos, video and links for more information.

 

My Video

Osceola Ghost Town in Seminole County

Resources

Memories of Osceola

Osceola on Ghost Towns of Florida 

Lake Harney Wilderness Area

 

Centralia Ghost Town in Hernando County

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Sawmill Ruins at Centralia

Located in Hernando County was once the boom town of Centralia during the early 1900’s. The town was mainly based around the logging industry and had one of the largest sawmills in the south at the time. Many towns were established from the logging and turpentine industries which were very big during this time. This area was surrounded by old and large Cypress trees that were very valuable to the logging industry so nearly all of them were cut down and that is when the town began to vanish. In fact many of these towns would disappear after these resources were used up.

The town had a population of around 2,000 people. There was a boarding house, a hotel, restaurant, drug store, church, school and even a movie house. A railroad line went into town for hauling lumber and delivering supplies. The town existed from around 1910 through 1922 and today only traces of the town remain. Nature is reclaiming the site and is now protected and part of the Chassahowitzka Wildlife Management Area. Check out my videos, photos and links below for more historical information.

My Videos

Ghost Town of Centralia 

Old Railroad Grade in Centralia

Resources

History of Centralia

Centralia on Ghost Towns of Florida

Short-Lived Logging Town of Centralia

Chassahowitzka Wildlife Management Area